Tag Archives: Wood

On Ten Foot Poles

farmersdotter’s bakery oven was built by Alan Scott. As the story goes, around the turn of the century there was a proposal that a communal wood fired oven be erected at the Grist Mill.

Grist Mill

Grist Mill

The idea struck a chord with some locals and a plan was rolled out to secure native Australian Alan Scott, the leading authority of his time on wood fired oven design and construction, and have him travel to the Grist Mill site and lead a workshop on how to build a wood fired oven. The Grist Mill in turn would presumably benefit from the oven and all that it entails.

For reasons unknown the Grist Mill site fell through, most likely due to conflicts with Mill’s heritage status but that is only this writer’s humble opinion. The search was on for an alternate venue. It was then fellow Australian and previous owner agreed to host the workshop on what was to become our farm. The oven was built. It then lay dormant and cold up until last year.  This year farmersdotter is regularly baking traditional naturally leavened bread in this fabulous oven.

With a baking hearth of  72″ X 96″ the oven is one of the largest Alan Scott designs capable of baking over sixty loaves a time. We routinely bake up to three batches per firing. We haven’t tried for four batches but feel confident we could.  Alan Scott oven plans, books, and information on workshops are available from  Oven Crafters.

Oven Interior

Alan Scott 72″ X 96″ baking hearth courtesy            UK Wood-Fired Oven Forum

One question we are often asked is where we build the fire to heat the oven. The answer is on the floor of the baking hearth. For pizza and bagels one could bake with a live fire on the hearth but for our sour dough recipes we remove the fire from the oven.  When the oven reaches 600 to 700 Fahrenheit and only embers remain we close the oven with a home made plug…

Home Made Plug

Home Made Plug

…to allow the temperature to moderate throughout the baking chamber.

After a few hours we unplug the oven and scrape forward ash and coals employing our Ten Foot Pole Scraper…

Ten Foot Poles

Ten Foot Poles: Peel and Scraper

…and let them drop into the ash pit located at the front of the hearth. The oven hearth is then cleaned or ‘scuffled’ with a water soaked towel attached to the end of yet another Ten Foot Pole.

I have always wanted to justify using the term ‘Ten Foot Pole’ and now I have. I can rest happy. Cheers!


On the Use of Firewood

Because we tend to burn through a lot of fire wood at farmersdotter Artisan Bread Bakery we are sometimes asked about the sustainability of using a wood fired oven. Yes, it takes a lot of wood but in the orchard rich Similkamen Valley we are blessed to have a supply of firewood as orchardists routinely replace aging blocks of fruit trees with popular high density varieties.

Fruit Wood

Fruit Wood

Cherry Branch Pile

Cherry Branch Pile

This can be a challenge because once an orchard block is removed the grower must immediately clear away the spent trees so replanting can begin. It can take up to five years for a new orchard to produce at capacity and a grower will not wait long to clear a remediated block.

 

 

 

Arguably it may be quicker to burn a pile of pulled up trees on site to get the land cleared but we work with a local, and all too chipper, contractor who works with growers to remove their old orchard blocks. He is good at it. He is quick which keeps the orchardist happy then processes the wood for farmersdotter which keeps us happy and him in business.

 

 

This is one our favourite trees at farmersdotter. It is a mountain ash full of rich berries for the birds. It will not see the inside of an oven anytime soon.

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash


Sucks to be Them

Crap.  Getting tired. Wasn’t prepared. Four workers planting garlic and I can’t keep pace supplying seed. It is best to crack your garlic as close to planting as possible. Why? Not too sure but it has something to do with freshness and possibly Shamanism.  The crew have the weekend off while I continue to crack garlic. Only 700 more pounds of garlic to get through and it will all be precessed into seed. Planting begins anew Monday but unfortunately showers are in the forecast. May make for muddy work. Sucks to be them.

At least we have the wood stove installed. Phase two is nearer to completion.

Wood Stove

Wood Stove


Phase Two

The end of the season is in sight. Not much time to finish planting and to do all the things one does around a farm before the water lines get blown out at the end of the month. I really would rather not spare the time but we simply can’t wait any longer to complete phase two of the house renovations. This month we receive new windows to replace the last of the jittery single pane, maybe good for a green house window, windows.

Old Window

Old Window

Although I’ll miss the cardboard in the panes,  new windows will go in. New exterior doors going in too. Every time the wind gusted from the west we thought for sure the glass pane on the porch door, which is held in place by one loose toggle and a bent nail, was going to blow in and smash into a gabillion pieces.

Porch Door

Porch Door

Everyone who sees our old windows and doors think it a shame to replace such lovely relics from the past. Pay our hydro bills and we’ll consider keeping them. We have however, ordered windows and doors that virtually match the retirees they replace, replicating the solid wood mullions and bronze hardware. Our old units will stay with us and most probably be recycled into a greenhouse somewhere.

This morning we head into town to gather the materials necessary to install the new wood stove. The cemented area was originally designed to accept a built in fireplace but we opted for a simpler and more efficient wood stove. The cavity will be filled with layers of cement board to the level of the sub floor. We removed a radius from the fir floor to provide sweep below the arc of the stove door as it opens which satisfies code.

Wood Stove Pad

Wood Stove Pad

Not to sure how many phases remain. farmersdotter controls most of that but each phase gets less mandatory and more enjoyable.


First Bake

In preparation for todays opening of the Penticton Farmers Market, we had a very busy go of it yesterday on our first bake. farmersdotter has nurtured her starter for about a month now and it turned out very well. Very active, full of good boozy smells and bubbles. It will bake a very respectable sour dough. At 2:00pm we were ready to move the dough from the mixer for the first rise.

First Batch

First Batch

Throughout the day we had been keeping a close eye on the oven. Trying to gauge the best time to remove the fire and let the oven temperature even out in time for the doughs second rise in the beautiful bannetons, the hand made wood baskets used as bread molds.

Bannetons

Bannetons

We added an Olive/Rosemary bread to the bake for grins and giggles.

Olive & Rosemary

Olive & Rosemary

By 11:00pm the oven temperature was averaging 450f throughout and the bread was performing well in their little wooden nests. It was time to wash the oven floor of ash residue, pack it full of fresh bread and see if the work of the past few weeks would pay off in the first bake. It did. The bread at rest smelled wonderful and was ‘singing’ for quite a while.

Resting

Resting

It turned out we were able to sell all the bread that was baked. We received wonderful comments and encouragement.

farmersdotter

farmersdotter


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