Hanging Garlic

Once the garlic is off the field we bundle the plants into bunches of about a dozen. A bundle large enough to easily grab with both hands. Bundles are placed on a tying table and the crew then links two bundles together with twine.

Just like saddling a horse each bundle is placed over a cross piece on a drying rack which resemble a ladder… only not.

After all the garlic is hung to dry in the barn, we call it a barn but it only has a roof for weather protection and is open on the sides to allow for great ventilation. Anyway, the garlic is hung for at least two and preferably three weeks before it is trimmed and cleaned for market.

So yeah. Hopefully that answers some questions you had about our simple method of drying garlic.


A Day in the Life

We have been harvesting our Russian Red garlic for a week now and anticipate pulling it all off by this Wednesday. Today we have a half crew finishing the last half of the garlic field.

The garlic will continue to hang on racks in the drying shed until at least the beginning of August at which time the crew will return to trim the roots and stalks. Shortly there after the garlic will go to market in 25 pound onion sacks.

The area for planting garlic this fall is under cover with Caliente 199 mustard from Rupp Seeds This mustard adds good bio mass and provides protection against a host of pest and disease.
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On Bitterroots and TV Shoots

On Monday farmersdotter and I hosted the crew from Quest OutWest’s “Wild Food”. The programme observes the four food chiefs; Bear, Salmon, Saskatoon Berry, and Bitterroot, and explores the varieties, heritage, cultivation and preparation of each. Our focus was on bitterroot, representative of all root vegetables and in our case garlic.

The project began as the brain child of series host Tracey Kim Bonneau

 

Tracey Kim Bonneau

Tracey Kim Bonneau

…and is now in production for release on the APTN Network next year. The programme is about Aboriginal foods and their place in history, culture and modern times and intends to weave together threads about growing up Okanagan, family, community, culture and health.

 

The day began with the arrival of the crew at 8:00am who then promptly set about the task of preparing for the first scene.

Exterior Setup

Exterior Setup

Weather conditions for the most part were favourable for the exterior scenes and of course the interior scenes which took place in the bakery held few challenges, at least the crew made it look very easy.

Bakery Setup

Bakery Setup

Topics varied from the psychological trauma experienced in confronting an elderly cow in a root cellar to land stewardship. Who’d have thought all that from root veggies?

The shoot culminated with a wonderful root vegetable nicoise with tuna expertly prepared by culinary consultant Scot Roger.

Scot Roger

Scot Roger

Root Vegetable Nicoise Salad

Root Vegetable Nicoise Salad

farmersdotter and I want to thank the whole crew of Wild Food for a wonderful and informative experience. In particular producers Suzan Derkson and Darlene Choo and director Richard Flower who pulled everything together with calm and grace. Cheers!


Rolling Mural

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Bruno & Laura from Panama en route to Argentina in their Costa Rican van which is a rolling mural project in progress. Yeah. Well, thats their story and they’re sticking to it. Find out more from Pinceladas de Latino

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Tulum Beaches in Brief

View north from ZaZilKin with ruins in the distance. 20140220-163729.jpg

We briefly explored the beach from the Tulum ruins south for about 15 kilometres. About 4 kilometres south of Tulum highway 109 rejoins the coast and intersects with the beach road at the new Tourist Police Station. To stay the course south on 109 you encounter several very good and some very expensive beach clubs. If you want to go full gringo this is a good area to explore. Lots of amenities and kite surfing. One day we would like to continue the 60 or so kilometres further down 109 to Punta Allen which we understand is a delightful coastal town.

At the Tourist Police Station should you decide to head north onto the beach road towards the ruins there is an expanse of over 2 kilometres of wonderful and mostly public beach. Here there are a handful of private beach clubs. Some clubs require your patronage and some request maybe you purchase a cerveza. It really depends on wether you want to use their beach loungers or not.

We choose instead to lay upon our sarongs, take a picnic lunch and beverages. The only issue is you want relief from the sun and who doesn’t enjoy the breeze under the shade of a palm. But this will necessitate the use of a beach club. As long as we purchase a couple of drinks the beach club we use is content to let us be.

We relax at ZaZilKin. Lots of palms, very secure and between noon and 3:00pm they offer 2 for 1 happy hour. Two drinks will cost $60.00 pesos and cerveza is $25.00 pesos.

From anywhere along this beach one can snorkel the reefs, kite surf, enjoy good food with live music. Relaxing and fabulous swimming. Never crowded and so far very secure and safe.

One small but important beach culture thing we learned straight off is never take a beach towel to the beach. They are bulky and hold too much sand when wet. Sarongs take up a fifth of the space and weight, dry instantly and are larger to boot.

You’ll be thankful too when it comes laundry time because you pay by weight at the lavenderia and with the humidity in Tulum a wet beach towel rarely dries thoroughly.


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