Boy You Guys Sure Are Lucky!

We get that a lot. When friends visit the farm for the first time we get “Boy you guys sure are lucky!” Seems weird that at age 56 luck should figure so prominently. Luck is for the less experienced, gamblers, and those with a penchant for casting their fate into the ether.

Of course what our friends mean is they acknowledge what we have. The farm. The farm thingys. The lifestyle and the freedom that comes with it. At this point I should make it clear that farmersdotter is younger than I. Not to do so would be unlucky.

Anyway, after several years working for the man options were weighed and the decision was made to pursue a different lifestyle. Other opportunities were present and opting for this farm was a conscience choice. Fortunate? Maybe. Lucky? Not so much.

Why mention this at all? Well, it goes to our philosophy of voting with your wallet. Consider what spending your hard earned store of labour means. Simply, it is a the value of your labour in return for the real cost of acquiring a benefit. Both values must be deemed fair and equal by both parties involved.

As the saying goes ‘we work hard for our money’ and its expenditure should be carefully weighed to ensure it is spent on commodities and services deserving of our efforts. If we decide we just have to have “that” then we calculate the store of labour invested in producing “that”. If the calculation says “that” isn’t fair and equitable then we barter. If bartering doesn’t work then we find “that” somewhere else or go without.

There we just voted with our wallet. We said the value isn’t with you but it might be with someone else. A little harsh but we’re talking about 56 years of accumulated store of labour here. Ain’t going to give it away. Too much respect for that.

In calculating the store of labour we consider the producer’s labour practices, environmental management policies and overall ethics. Don’t like it? Don’t buy it. No ticky no laundry.

Would we invite an unethical producer into our home for a Coke? No. We don’t buy Coke. We don’t buy anything made by Coke. We calculate we don’t like Coke. No ticky.

We do buy fair trade organic coffee. Would you like organic cream and my neighbour’s organic honey with that?


End of the Season

At the end of the season it is wonderful to look back, reflect and simply enjoy. One wonderful moment from last season was the infamous hail storm that past through the valley at the end of May. In its wake it left a magical double rainbow that farmersdotter was able to capture. Happy Thanksgiving and cheers!

Double Rainbow

Double Rainbow

 

 


Freezer Bake 2014

If you reside anywhere from Osoyoos to Summerland and desire farmersdotter bread for the winter all you need do is PM us your order from this sites contact page or through farmersdotter facebook page . Like us on facebook too!
Anyway, please order before October 31. Include your email, phone number and an address for delivery with your order. We’ll work out the logistics but you’ll receive your fresh baked bread double bagged and ready to pop in the freezer, if you so choose. The bread will last well into the spring so no worries because we bake again for the first Penticton Farmers Market May 2, 2015
And just like at the Penticton Farmers Market each loaf is $6.50. There is no charge for delivery and there is no minimum order but priority will be given to folks with orders of six loaves and over. We’ll prearrange delivery with you but regardless plan to expect delivery on one of the first two Saturdays in November.
Cheers!

Hanging Garlic

Once the garlic is off the field we bundle the plants into bunches of about a dozen. A bundle large enough to easily grab with both hands. Bundles are placed on a tying table and the crew then links two bundles together with twine.

Just like saddling a horse each bundle is placed over a cross piece on a drying rack which resemble a ladder… only not.

After all the garlic is hung to dry in the barn, we call it a barn but it only has a roof for weather protection and is open on the sides to allow for great ventilation. Anyway, the garlic is hung for at least two and preferably three weeks before it is trimmed and cleaned for market.

So yeah. Hopefully that answers some questions you had about our simple method of drying garlic.


A Day in the Life

We have been harvesting our Russian Red garlic for a week now and anticipate pulling it all off by this Wednesday. Today we have a half crew finishing the last half of the garlic field.

The garlic will continue to hang on racks in the drying shed until at least the beginning of August at which time the crew will return to trim the roots and stalks. Shortly there after the garlic will go to market in 25 pound onion sacks.

The area for planting garlic this fall is under cover with Caliente 199 mustard from Rupp Seeds This mustard adds good bio mass and provides protection against a host of pest and disease.
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